Overview

First, UV rays from the sun hit the solar panels on the roof. The panels then convert the energy collected from the UV rays, into DC electricity, which flows to an inverter. The inverter then converts the DC to AC. AC is what your house uses.

So, what happens if you’re not home to use the electricity your solar panels are generating every day?

All excess electricity generated from your solar system that is made throughout the day is exported back onto 'The Grid Network' via 'Net-Metering'. You then receive compensation for this extra power through your electricity supplier..

​ HOWEVER, advancements in technology in the solar world have led to the creation of a 'Hybrid Battery System'. This means not only would you be utilising the solar power that has been generated throughout the day, you are now also able to store excess electricity that has been generated during daylight hours for utilisation in the evenings

Where does solar energy come from?

Our sun is a naturally occurring nuclear reactor. It releases tiny packets of energy called photons, which travel the 93 million miles from the sun to Earth in about eight-and-a-half minutes. Every hour, enough photons impact our planet to theoretically satisfy global energy needs for an entire year.

Solar technology is improving and costs are dropping rapidly, although, our ability to harness the sun’s abundance of energy is on the rise. In fact, a report from the International Energy Agency indicates that solar energy could become the largest global source of electricity by 2050.

In the coming years, we will all be enjoying the benefits of solar-generated electricity in one way or another.

How does solar power work?

Photovoltaic (PV) solar panels are made up of many solar cells. Solar cells are made of silicon-like semiconductors. They are constructed with a positive layer and a negative layer, which together create an electric field, just like in a battery.

When photons hit a solar cell, they knock electrons loose from their atoms. If conductor's attach to the positive and negative sides of a cell, an electrical circuit is created. When electrons flow through such a circuit, they generate electricity.

Multiple cells make up a solar panel, and multiple panels (modules) can be wired together to form a solar array. The more panels you can deploy, the more energy you can expect to generate.

How does the electricity work?

PV solar panels generate DC (direct current) electricity. With DC electricity, electrons flow in one direction around a circuit.

With AC (alternating current) electricity, electrons are pushed and pulled, periodically reversing direction, much like the cylinder of a car’s engine. Generators’ create AC electricity when a coil of wire is spun next to a magnet. Many different energy sources can drive this generator, such as gas or diesel fuel, hydroelectricity, nuclear, coal, wind, or solar.

AC electricity was chosen for the Australian electrical power grid, primarily because it is less expensive to transmit over long distances. However, solar panels create DC electricity. How is DC electricity delivered into the AC grid? We use an inverter.

How do inverters work?

PV solar panels generate DC (direct current) electricity. With DC electricity, electrons flow in one direction around a circuit.

With AC (alternating current) electricity, electrons are pushed and pulled, periodically reversing direction, much like the cylinder of a car’s engine; generators create AC electricity when a coil of wire is spun next to a magnet. .

NetMetering

A grid-tied PV system has no batteries. So when the sun is shining and the solar user doesn’t use all of the energy generated in a day, excess power is sent out of the house and directed to the grid.

This is called “back feeding” the grid. At night, the grid will provide energy for lights and other appliances as usual, so solar users are covered in exchange for the excess energy they share with the grid during the day. A net meter records the energy sent, compared to the energy received from the grid.

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